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Sunday Assembly

First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis Sunday Assembly.

Look Back Once In a While

Our monthly theme is “Celebrating Blessings.” None of us likes the state of the nation at the moment but looking back at where we’ve been is cause for celebration. Note: I will talk about progressive successes and look a bit more closely at how difficult those actually were for those involved. History glosses over the time and boredom of social… Read More »Look Back Once In a While

FUS Music Sunday

A soft opening of chamber works, written by Ted Olsen and collaborators Aby Wolf, and Sophia Leenay. This music stands at the interstices of several of Ted’s musical loves – including contemporary classical, indie rock, and modern jazz. This project arose out of pandemic sketches, undertaken while pondering the works of artists such as: Ambrose Akinmusire, Caroline Shaw, Maria Schneider, Joni Mitchell, Maurice Ravel,… Read More »FUS Music Sunday

Becoming is an Anti-memory

This is a short phrase from the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. It underlines a fact about how we combine memory and anticipation to live in the possibilities of the moment. On a day that we celebrate our graduating high school seniors and our many volunteers, let’s consider what is next. Text of Talk (PDF): Becoming is an Anti-memory

Summer’s Lease

William Shakespeare wrote, “Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, /And Summer’s lease hath all too short a date . . . ” (Sonnet 18). Beauty, ephemerality, and storms. Those words go a long way toward encompassing our lives. Enjoy special music from Martha Hardesty and Maureen Hunt.

We’re Not Done Here

Our Annual Meeting marks the 141st year of First Unitarian Society and our 106th year of being a congregational humanist gathering. Over those decades some things have changed a lot. Many things haven’t changed at all. The conclusion that I draw from all this? We’re not done here!

Getting All Meta About It

Both Unitarian Universalism and Humanism are products of the nineteenth century idea that all religions come from a common source–perhaps a god, perhaps the human mind. There is a dark side to this conviction.  Text of Talk (PDF): Getting All Meta About It

Seedbeds and Worms (Buddhas and Flies)

The great Japanese poet Kobayashi Issa wrote, “Where there are humans / You’ll find flies / And Buddhas.” Our theme for the month of May is Nurturing Beauty. Who doesn’t love beauty, but too often the nurturing part gets onerous.  Text of Talk (PDF): Seedbeds and Worms (Buddhas and Flies)